Making It Work, Part 1

How are schools around the country telling the story of the year? Check out this series as we highlight the incredible work yearbook staffs are doing under unusual circumstances. Yearbook staffs have had to find new ways to cover what's happening at their school, and they've done an incredible job so far!

Featured post

Editor-in-chief’s Corner

In my progression from beginning journalist to editor-in-chief, I have attended three JEA/NSPA fall national conventions: 2008 in St. Louis, 2009 in Washington, D.C. and 2010 in Kansas City. All have provided invaluable opportunities to me personally and to our entire Cambia staff at Oak Park High School in Kansas City, Mo.

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December 16, 2009 / Editor-in-chief's Corner

At our school, yearbook is not a mandatory activity, but one that requires staffers to dedicate their own free time. It always proves to be a challenge to finish our 308-page book with an extracurricular staff of only 16 members who don’t get a grade. Encouraging them to work is not an easy task, but we have learned some surefire methods needed to meet our deadlines.

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It is always with some hesitation that a wholly original approach is taken in developing a yearbook theme. Given the diversity inherent to our west Texas border town of El Paso, the 2009 Franklin High School yearbook staff and I sought to reflect the many dimensions of living on a border by choosing a theme relevant to our existence.

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Yearbook staff members typically form cliques based on previous friendships and their grade levels. Freshmen are often intimidated by the upperclassmen and are reluctant to ask them for help during deadline crunches. New members of any grade are unsure of their roles and how they fit in.

These situations can create an uncomfortable working environment within the classroom. Experienced staff members know how to make newcomers feel welcome in this high-stress environment where they have much to learn.

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