Academy yearbook advisers learn a marketing plan of attack

Written by Susan Wuckowitsch

If a tree falls in a forest, does it make a sound? Or, in yearbook terms… If you spend a year of long hours and hard work on a yearbook and no one buys it, was all that time wasted?

The Yearbook Marketing sessions at the Adviser Academy this week offered a great opportunity for advisers to learn creative ways to sell books to students and parents.

The Tuesday afternoon class discussed the concepts of marketing, including the importance of creating a yearbook that people want to buy, setting the price where it is low enough for people to afford but not so low that people don’t perceive it as valuable, hitting the emotions of the purchaser and getting the message out to purchasers.

There is no such thing as getting the yearbook message in front of the purchaser too often. Make sure you let your students AND parents know WHY they want a yearbook, how to buy one (or two!) and make it as easy as possible for them to buy. And…SURPRISE…it’s easier than you think.

Advisers who attended this session left with a written plan of which marketing tactics will work for them and how to use them. “That’s a good idea!” was heard several times during this 3-hour open exchange of ideas. The class was certainly an exchange of ideas, as the Walsworth marketing team also left with some fantastic ideas to help schools sell more yearbooks. If you weren’t able to attend the class, be sure to check out the Marketing Help page on walsworthyearbooks.com today!

Susan Wuckowitsch

Susan Wuckowitsch is a misplaced Texan brought to Kansas City by meat (like many people). Several years in meat sales and even more at advertising agencies taught her valuable lessons, including how to sell. She makes her parents proud by actually using her marketing degree from the University of Texas as a Marketing Supervisor for Walsworth Yearbooks. During her 10 years at Walsworth, she has combined her experience and education with a natural love of helping people to work with schools on how to spread the joy of yearbooks to reluctant purchasers.