July 23, 2009 / Noteworthy / Staff Management

Remember when…

Written by Idea File Staff

Think back to your first year as an adviser. What memories do you still have from that first year, and what’s the most important piece of advice you would give to a new adviser now?

Give us your comments below!

  • Nunn Winship

    I inherited from a retiring yearbook adviser a pair of well-trained editors and a staff who had an idea of what needed to be done. Unfortunately, they had bonded with the last adviser and (most emphatically) did not want to work with me. Worse, it was a journalism class with and English credit, and I insisted they could (would) also put out a monthly newspaper. Disaster in the making.

    I also acquired a new principal who had some experience in yearbook advising. He heard the students’ complaints and opinions, informed them of my status as adviser/journalism teacher and their status as students. Basically, we came to a compromise that I would be hands-off on the yearbook, and they would create a newspaper. They fudged on the paper, and I couldn’t help making suggestions on occasion. But through the year we developed a working level of mutual respect.

    The juniors had no experience with the old adviser, and were groomed as the newspaper editors with the understanding that they would move up to yearbook editors the next year. Once the seniors were gone, they blossomed, especially when I told them that they could create their own, new traditions.

    My suggestions? Relax. You might get lucky and have a crew that wants to work with you. Whether or not, be in contact with other yearbook advisers, past and present. Read all the tips you can find. Organize the kids to do the work. And perhaps the most important of all (to keep the higher ups happy) be agressive in your sales campaigns and follow-up PR.

Idea File Staff

Idea File Staff reports are posts compiled by the Walsworth Yearbooks Marketing Department, covering a wide range of yearbook topics.